Threat and vulnerability management

Sitting in cars with hackers

2 minute read

Are organizations doing enough to protect us?

Key takeaways:

  • Similar to the auto industry, organizations should take all precautionary tests to ensure the safety of the customer and disclose the test results.
  • 23% of financial institutions have outdated software.
  • In the retail industry, patching has become the biggest offender affecting 25% of organizations.
  • If simple and common vulnerabilities are still so prevalent, how can anyone know whether companies are doing enough to ensure client data is safe?

Safety and managed risk are key concepts businesses rely on every day. Each day, people get into their vehicles and put their life in the hands of manufacturers, assuming that they properly built and tested the vehicles to keep them safe on the road. Driving is such a standard practice that millions of people across the world get in their vehicles every day without giving it a second thought. In fact, most of our daily motions require assumed risk that we are blind to; sitting in a chair, locking the front door, turning on the stove, or riding a bike to name a few.

The same goes for digital activities. Are trusted organizations such as banks, grocery stores, or other online merchants taking all the appropriate measures to protect us? Systems are constantly updated, software patches are installed, and networks are reconfigured daily. But how much do they really share about the security and testing that went into those updates, patches, and reconfigurations?

Most organizations don’t share enough. According to our upcoming Pen Risk Report, 23% of financial institutions have outdated software, and in the retail industry, patching has become the biggest offender affecting 25% of organizations. If these kinds of vulnerabilities are still so prevalent, how can anyone know whether companies are doing enough to ensure client data is safe?

Organizations should never cut corners, but time and time again they ignore the warning signs and keep security checks at the bottom of the to-do list. Continue reading the Sitting in cars with hackers white paper to see what the automotive industry can teach us about defending against cybercrime.

Find the full white paper at: https://www.coalfire.com/insights/resources/white-papers/sitting-in-cars-with-hackers

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