The Coalfire Labs Blog

Welcome to the Coalfire Labs Blog, a resource covering the most important issues in IT security and compliance.  The Coalfire Labs blog is written by the company's leadership team and our highly-credentialed security assessment experts.


  • With IoT, Common Devices Pose New Threats

    April, 2020, Dan McInerney, Senior Security Consultant, Coalfire

    For Instance… Hackers Setting Your 3D Printer on Fire

    The world is careening toward the reality that almost all electronics in your home and business are connected to the internet. Many of these devices contain things like heating elements, batteries, and motors that are entirely software-controlled. Do you… trust them? Coalfire decided to see how low the barrier was for hackers to attempt to cause life-threatening harm by weaponizing one of today’s increasingly common and cheap devices. In this three-part blog post, we will identify the target, uncover challenges, and hopefully answer our query above.

  • The Basics of Exploit Development 2: SEH Overflows

    March, 2020, Andy Bowden, Consultant, Coalfire Labs

    In this article we will be writing an exploit for a 32-bit Windows application vulnerable to Structured Exception Handler (SEH) overflows. While this type of exploit has been around for a long time, it is still applicable to modern systems.

  • The Significance of the NIST Privacy Framework

    February, 2020, Mali Yared, Practice Director, Cyber Risk Advisory & Privacy, Coalfire

    Kudos to the NIST Privacy Team! Privacy Framework v.1.0 has finally been released. I’ve been tracking the growth of this initiative since the focus group was kicked off in September 2018 and respect its thoroughly explored yet fundamentally grass roots approach. A few points worth bringing to your attention:

  • The Basics of Exploit Development 1: Win32 Buffer Overflows

    January, 2020, Andy Bowden, Consultant, Coalfire Labs

    In this article we will cover the creation of an exploit for a 32-bit Windows application vulnerable to a buffer overflow using X64dbg and the associated ERC plugin. As this is the first article in this series, we will be looking at an exploit where we have a complete EIP overwrite and ESP points directly into our buffer. A basic knowledge of assembly and the Windows operating system will be useful, however, it is not a requirement.

  • ERC.Net – A Toolset for Analyzing Windows Application Crashes

    October, 2019, Andy Bowden, Consultant, Coalfire Labs

    ERC.Net is a collection of tools designed to assist in analyzing and debugging Windows application crashes in order to identify potential security vulnerabilities. Supporting both 64 and 32 bit applications, ERC.Net has many use cases including parsing Windows file headers, identifying compile-time flags such as ASLR, DEP and SafeSEH, generating nonrepeating patterns and platform-specific egg hunters, detecting process information such as loaded modules and running threads, reading the TEB of a specific thread, and assisting in the identification of numerous types of memory vulnerabilities.

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